Scottish electronica act Errors have shown steady growth through the years. The band’s debut, It’s Not Something But It Is Like Whatever, was a calculated assault of electronics and synth, and their second album, Come Down With Me, brought in a bit more melody while retaining those previous elements. Now on their third full-length release, Have Some Faith In Magic, Errors are utilizing their songwriting skills in a more restrained way, to great effect.

The album opens with “Tusk”, a song equally driven by both synthesizers and guitars. At heart, the Scottish band still retains elements of their more recognizable United Kingdom brothers in post-rock, 65daysofstatic and Mogwai. But whereas both those bands tend to go for more crescendos, crashing guitar riffs, and heavy electronic thuds, Errors paves their way with gentle melodies.

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Have Some Faith in Magic is also the death of the vocal-less phase of Errors. Most instrumental bands can only last so long before dabbling with them, and Errors use vocals like other spacey electronica acts do; the vocals are merely just another layer of melody, just another instrument. “Magna Encarta” and “Cloud Chamber” echo throughout with electronic-swamped vocals, adding extra scope to the songs – but the band never uses vocals as the main driving point.

One of Errors strengths has been their fine balance between melody and hard-driving electronic beats. As much as the band relies upon slight and small build-ups in songs, the fantastic “Pleasure Palaces” shows the band knows how to execute the tried-and-true post-rock grandstanding of high audio peaks and deep sonic valleys. The song maintains a thorough dance club feel throughout without completely devolving into nothing more than a drum and bass beat. Subtlety has now become Errors strongest suit, which is fitting of a band that has been slowly but surely fine-tuning its brand of music over the years.

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