All posts by Jason Simpson

J. Simpson is attempting the unlikely, seeking to master 3 separate, but interlocking traditions: music, audio production, and writing. As you can probably imagine, he drowns in sound and wallows in noise, and writes down the effects, using himself as a guinea pig for psychoacoustic experiments.J. Simpson has written about music for REDEFINE, Freq Magazine, The Active Listener, Weirdo Music, and Chain DLK, and writes about horror for Amazing Stories. He is the founder and author of the Forestpunk journal, as well as co-founder of the Bitstar art and music collective. He also makes music with the love of his lifetime in the band Meta Pinnacle, and solo under the name Dessicant. He lives in Portland, OR.
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Dream Police – Hypnotized & Cult of Youth – Final Days Comparative Album Reviews (Sacred Bones)

Every record is an island. An artist’s statements shouldn’t always be judged on trends, the label they’re on, or what other people are doing. Perhaps they shouldn’t even be judged against that artist’s own work. It’s all too common in the current state of music journalism or criticism to hear, “This isn’t as good as...Read...
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Grouper – Ruins Album Review (kranky)

Ruins, as a word, can mean two things: as a noun, it is a decrepit run-down structure, no longer inhabited. Ruins, as a verb, is to degrade something, to bring about its demise, to fall into ruin. This ambiguity of meaning reveals a hidden face in Grouper’s new album, which is much concerned with uncertainty,...
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Mary Lattimore & Jeff Zeigler – Slant of Light Album Review (Thrill Jockey Records)

The harp, as an instrument, seems to inherently conjure medieval, Celtic, or angelic imagery. When it is joined by swirling synthesizers and bilious clouds of delayed guitars, the brain is left with all manner of interesting juxtapositions, like a tea room melting into sea foam, or some fictitious movie with moonbeams, meteor showers, and unicorns....
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Vessel – Punish, Honey Album Review (Tri Angle Records)

There are hardly any electronic instruments on Punish, Honey. Instead, Vessel's Sebastian Gainsborough built an arsenal of homemade instruments, including flutes made out of bike frames, sheets of metal, and "harmonic guitars". Punish, Honey is an industrialized suite: clanking, stomping, sparking, twitching, pounding. But instead of the giving the sensation of a migraine -- which...
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