Experimental Music on Children’s TV (EMoCTV): Mike Haley’s Retrospective Blog

“I think exposing kids to as much shit as possible is really important, just so they know it exists. If you only ate apples, and only got your kid apples, then their favorite fruit would be apples. But that’s just because they haven’t gripped a mango, or banana, or plum yet. Maybe they’ll hate every other fruit and truly dig apples. Or maybe they don’t really like apples. You see where I’m going with this?” - Mike Haley of Experimental Music on Children’s TV

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A World Not Ours Documentary Film Review: A Look Inside Palestinian Refugee Camp Ain al-Hilweh

Regardless of your feelings about Palestine, A World Not Ours is a must watch for those interested in themes of landlessness, family, and what it means to be privileged. Through the narrative lens, we get a glimpse into life inside a semi-permanent Palestinian refugee camp in south Lebanon. It is, of course, neither possible to dissociate the film from the political implications of the setting, nor does the film attempt to do so. Yet the glimpses of life that we see offer insight into what it means to be marooned in another country with few rights, into what family and community mean in such a setting, and the pressures of this oppressive life. The camp is called Ain al-Hilweh. Early

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Top Vintage Polish Film Posters: A Comparative Interview w/ Eye Sea Posters & The Affiche Studio

Generally brightly-colored and psychedelic in nature, Polish film, theatre, and circus posters from the mid-1940s through the 1980s have played a major role on inspiring modern poster art and graphic design. Supported at the time by the Polish government and arguably transformed into the prime form of art in the nation, Polish posters are known for their ability to hint at deeper meanings and personalities through allusion and metaphor, initially seen only as bold strokes of visual fancy. Their history is a complex and dynamic one worthy of many more words, influenced equally by Communism and politics as the state of the international arts scene of the time.

In this comparative interview, we speak with two creative studios — Eye Sea Posters, based in the United Kingdom and dedicated to poster archiving and reselling, and The Affiche Studio, which is based in the United States and dedicated to poster restoration — on just what makes Polish posters so compelling, to this day.

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Female Coming-Of-Age Tales: A Three-Way Film Review of La Sirga, They’ll Come Back, and Tall As The Baobab Tree

Defined by Merriam-Webster as, “The attainment of prominence, respectability, recognition, or maturity,” “coming-of-age” is widely considered a point in every young person’s life when they walk the precarious edge between being a child and being an adult member of their community. This edge might be magnified by any number of given plot turns – be it a forced exile, an unexpected abandonment, or the opportunity to fight for something of great importance; in the feature directorial debuts, La Sirga by William Vega, They’ll Come Back by Marcelo Lordello and Tall As The Baobab Tree by Jeremy Teicher, the coming-of-age narrative is central, poignant and profound. Vega, Lordello and Teicher not only tend to their subjects with compassion and intimacy, they

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Philosophical Influence Timeline: Alejandro Jodorowsky – The Holy Mountain

Call it a spiritual treatise, a visual masterpiece, or whatever you like — but Alejandro Jodorowsky’s 1973 film, The Holy Mountain, has inspired musicians dating as far back as members of the Beatles, who played an instrumental role in funding and distributing the work. In this timeline of artistic individuals inspired by The Holy Mountain, we work backwards from the present day to the year in which the film was born, passing many music videos, songs, and philosophical shout-outs along the way. The creation of this timeline began with the intention of finding commonalities between the individuals who value Jodorowsky’s works, but the trend that emerged was much more varied than expected. More than anything, this timeline highlights the fact that though Jodorowsky influences many artistically-experimental thinkers, how they are influenced can sometimes be surprising, and is often completely unrelated to the author’s original intention and beliefs.

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Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF) 2013: Best & Worst Films Round-Up Reviews

There is an inherent danger with really diving full-force into a film festival that has a scope as large as the Seattle International Film Festival. Often, the movies are top notch, well-selected and well-curated, and fit perfectly within the framework of that section of the festival. Other times, after sitting through self-indulgent artsy dribble that someone, somewhere, found interesting enough to greenlight with millions of dollars, you realize sadly that two or more hours of your life will never return. Now that we’re through SIFF 2013, we’ve decided to give the rundown of what we appreciate and what we will never need to watch again. The African Cypher (South Africa) Directed by Bryan Little * TOP PICK * Films like

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Northwest – Nordvest Film Review (Denmark, 2013)

Michael Noer is a gritty realist, concerned with the unstoppable inertia of the city. Crossing back and forth between documentary and fiction, Noer sees no line between the constructed plots of his films and the real-life social fissures in Danish society. His depictions of the malfunctioning systems that entrap youth into a life of crime and poverty are starkly grounded in reality, which makes the characters in his films all the more believable and tragic.  

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Computer Chess Documentary Film Review (United States, 2013)

An abysmal effort in attempting to bring meaning to style, Computer Chess goes no further than a tedious exercise in stretching (bad) ideas until they tear. The film’s major selling point is that it was filmed using ancient video cameras, documentary style, in order to capture the spirit of the wild frontier of technology in the late seventies. But spirit seems to be the farthest thing from the filmmakers’ minds in this case; instead, C-grade characters with B-grade potential are burdened with a D-minus concept. And we’re given the raw result.  

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Our Children – À Perdre La Raison Film Review – Belgium, 2013

At the start of Our Children, a young couple frolicks about, madly in love, over-the-top saccharine, full of wordless smiles and child-like naivete. Soon, an elderly doctor, clearly a father-figure in the young man’s life, appears. He warns the young man against a serious relationship with the young woman, citing the cultural difference of her being Belgian and him being a Moroccan immigrant as a prime reason. This disapproval offers the first signs of strain, hinting that the young man is somehow indebted to the older man, though the reasons are unclear.  

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Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF) 2013 Preview: Films We’re Looking At Potentially Being Excited About

Due the unfortunate fact that we are merely human and Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF) is just beginning its three-week film rampage, we’ve sifted through the Festival’s gigantic catalog to come up with the best films of the bunch — or so we suspect. SIFF is annually guaranteed to have a mixture of some of the best and worst films that one can see — and these film recommendations come from the minds of three REDEFINE writers with good intentions. Yet at best, these selections are our most educated hypotheses, determined from a mixture of film industry knowledge and intuitions based on trailers. Below, we’ve grouped our selections for 2013 by world region. Stay tuned in the weeks to come,

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Portland International Festival 2013: Festival Preview & Picks

The Portland International Film Festival (PIFF) is upon us again, and we have whittled down their list of 100+ international shorts and full-length films to summarize the most interesting, socially-conscious, and boundary-pushing of the bunch. This year’s festival runs from February 7th through the 23rd, beginning with an Opening Night celebration featuring Blancanieves, a silent Spanish reworking of Snow White. Purchase tickets and find out more. Our festival preview begins below with this year’s top five picks, followed by the rest in alphabetical order. Beyond The Hills Directed by Cristian Mungiu (Romania) Based on the novels of Tatiana Niculescu Bran, which are real-life documents of demonic possession, Beyond The Hills is a bleak and stark religious drama set an Orthodox

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Almanya – Welcome To Germany (Almanya – Willkommen in Deutschland) (2011) Film Review

During the 1960s, a flood of immigration brought thousands of Turks from their homeland to Germany, with promises of well-paying career opportunities. Without cultural context, one might find such a German and Turkish association to be bizarre — but when given historical context, which the heartwarming and humorous Almanya — Willkommen in Deutschland provides, one begins to understand the fascinating culture surrounding that population, which has now spent decades in a foreign country. Almanya documents the story of a Turkish family, headed by a grandpa who has seen his children grow to father more children in Germany. Each member of the large family seems to hold a different opinion about his or her Turkish-German upbringing and personal degree of assimilation

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