Wes Anderson’s Moonrise Kingdom Giveaway!

Recent influence polls with REDEFINE artists and musicians have revealed that director Wes Anderson, known for such hits as The Royal Tenenbaums, Rushmore, and Life Aquatic, has a new film out in theatres! Set in the ’60s, Moonrise Kingdom is the tale of two young kids who fall in love and run away together. When the entire island town mobilizes to search for them, everything turns unpredictable — and unpredictably filled with Boy Scout costumes.   See all artists & musicians inspired by Wes Anderson In honor of the release of this film, Focus Features is offering a prize pack for giveaway! Three (3) winners who send a message to letters@redefinemag.com with the subject line “MOONRISE KINGDOM” and their name

MORE »

Rent-A-Cat (2012) Film Review

Rent-A-Cat chronicles the good-heartedly travels of Sayoko (Mikako Ichikawa), a woman who lives alone. Well, she doesn’t exactly live alone; Sayoko lives with cats. A lot of cats. After her grandmother died, Sayoko operates a cat rental business where she loans out cats to the lonely individuals throughout the world seeking to fill holes in their hearts. All the while, Sayoko deals with her own loneliness, because despite being surrounded by the cats she loves…cats can only love so much.   Directed by Naoko Ogigami Director Naoko Ogigami is sort of a Japanese Wes Anderson — someone who lives and dies by the quirkiness of her films. Rent-A-Cat is chock full of repeated scenarios. Each time Sayoko loans a cat

MORE »

Fuck My Wedding (2011) Film Review

Most often when you are attending a foreign film at a film festival, you expect something dark, heavy, and pretty much non-American. For that reason, it is almost a nice breath of fresh air to see Fuck My Wedding at Seattle International Film Festival, as it is a traditional American romantic comedy that just happens to take place in Santiago, Chile and star Chilean actors and actresses.   Fuck My Wedding takes up where its predecessor Fuck My Life ends. Javier (Ariel Levy) proposes to his berserkly attractive girlfriend Ángela (Andrea Velasco) after she accidentally gets pregnant. From the onset, it is clear that Javier’s head isn’t in the relationship, as he is tempted by his boss’s daughter Lucia (Lorenzo

MORE »

Rebellion (2011) Film Review

Expectations can be a tricky best, especially when it comes to films. The trailer for Mathieu Kassovitz’s newest film, Rebellion, really makes it seem like a wartime story. In a sense, Rebellion is a wartime story, insomuch that it is set against the tense occupation of the French colony of New Caledonia. But from pretty much the opening sequence on, Rebellion is less a story of battle than it is a story of trying to stop one.   Fellipe Legorjus (Kassovitz) is the captain of the GIGN, a special forces unit trained to tactically deal with terrorist operations generally involving hostages. Legorjus arrives on the island of New Caledonia because Kanak separatists led by Alphonse Dianou (Iabe Lapacas) have taken

MORE »

Italy: Love It or Leave It Film Review (2011)

Italy, for all of its romantic and historic wonder, is a country that often seems to be masquerading as a third world country. This is a country, after all, whose recent Prime Minister resigned after a sex scandal (his umpteenth one) that would make a soap opera love triangle seem standard. Italy is a country thoroughly embracing the European debt crisis, and the unemployment rate in young adults is sky high. But despite all of this, Italy, is still a country that virtually every foreigner loves unto death. Gustav Hofer and Luca Ragazzi are looking at a crucial moment in their life. Most of their friends have departed from the country, and Gustav wants to move to Berlin. Luca still

MORE »

Klown (Klovn) Film Review (2010)

There was a time when it seemed that the only way an American studio knew how to make money was to churn out some poorly written, slapstick, gross-out comedy with sexual hijinks that invoked cringes, laughs, and three or four poorly written sequels. But just to be clear: films relying entirely on hyper-sexualized situations don’t necessarily have to be from a US studio, as the Danish film Klown demonstrates.   KLOWN FILM REVIEW AND THEATRICAL TRAILER CONTINUED BELOW Klown follows the clueless and witless Frank (Frank Hvam), who just found out his wife Mia (Mia Lyhne) is pregnant and doesn’t think that Frank has what it takes to be a good father. To prove her wrong, in a series of

MORE »

SIFF 2012 Festival Preview: European Film Picks, Part Two

The 2012 Seattle International Film Festival begins on May 17th, 2012! In the next few days, we will be providing film previews for our top SIFF picks of the year. Times and dates are subject to change, so please visit siff.net before heading to theatres, or see HERE for all film preview coverage, including film selections from other regions of the world.   4 DAYS IN MAY Germany/Russia/Ukraine Directed by Achim von Borries Set in 1945 and based off a true story, 4 Days Of May follows the days before the official end of World War II. The Germans have already lost, but as soldiers and civilians both learn how to deal with the change, drama and unconventional decision-making ensue.

MORE »

Eden Film Review (2012)

Based on the real life story of survivor-activist Chong Kim, Eden pulls no punches while following through with its dramatic premise of a young woman abducted and forced into prostitution. Jamie Chung plays Hyun-Jae, a first-generation Korean-American high school student looking to get into some innocent trouble. But she finds more than her share when she is abducted and sent to a sex slavery facility run by corrupt warden Bob Gault (Beau Bridges) along with his second-in-command, the vermin-esque Vaughan (Matt O’ Leary). The film pivots not on Hyun-Jae’s trials and suffering, but rather on the relationship between the three leads. It’s an almost Shakespearean triangle: Bob is commanding, domineering, an absolutist with no conscience. Vaughan is power hungry, tired

MORE »

Family Portrait In Black And White Documentary Film Review (2012)

In Family Portrait In Black And White, middle-aged single mother Olga Nenya decides to brave social stigmas to foster 17 orphans, many of whom are Ukranian-African. As the film opens, one sees third-party interviews with Ukranian skinheads that immediately couch the film in a setting of acial discrimination. Given the film’s title, its synopsis, and these opening sequences, one expects the entire film to be about the struggles of foster parenting in a mixed race family — but this expectation would be wrong. Nenya and her seventeen foster children live and work on a farm, slightly removed from the mainstay of Ukranian society. Through the use of minor anecdotes, the film asserts time and time again that racism and discrimination

MORE »

Bestiaire Documentary Film Review (2012)

“If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?” If one were to pose this classic philosophical question to the director of Bestiaire, Denis Côté, Côté would probably respond with an emphatic yes. Bestiaire, centered around Montreal’s open-air zoo, Parc Safari, seems to be a long and slow-paced response to this exact question. Directed by Denis Côté, Canada  

MORE »

SIFF 2012 Festival Preview: U.S., Canadian, South Pacific Film Picks

The 2012 Seattle International Film Festival begins on May 17th, 2012! In the next few days, we will be providing film previews for our top SIFF picks of the year. Times and dates are subject to change, so please visit siff.net before heading to theatres, or see HERE for all film preview coverage, including film selections from other regions of the world.   JOSHUA TREE, 1951: A PORTRAIT OF JAMES DEAN United States/France Directed by Matthew Mishory Inspired by the facts, and perhaps some fictions, about James Dean’s too-short life, this boundary-stretching film imagines the cinematic icon’s bisexual pre-fame days and ruminates about the steep costs that come with being a star. Black and white and color. May 24th @

MORE »

SIFF 2012 Festival Preview: Latin American & African Film Picks

The 2012 Seattle International Film Festival begins on May 17th, 2012! In the next few days, we will be providing film previews for our top SIFF picks of the year. Times and dates are subject to change, so please visit siff.net before heading to theatres, or see HERE for all film preview coverage, including film selections from other regions of the world.   FOUND MEMORIES Brazil/Argentina/France Directed by Julia Murat A youthful photographer decides to open up her eyes and mind to the stories of older individuals in a small Brazilian town, giving new perspectives on life and death. May 22 @ 9:00pm, Harvard Exit May 24 @ 3:30pm, SIFF Cinema Uptown  

MORE »