Metavari Band Interview: Black as Midnight on a Moonless Night

Oftentimes, a complete change in sound and a long delay between full-length albums marks the death knell of a band, or at least a rebirth. After a long brainstorming session — during which the band lost a guitarist, put out an EP without that guitarist, and gained another in time for the latest record — Metavari has returned, and the Metavari you hear on Moonless is not the Metavari you heard six years ago, during the release of Be One of Us and Hear No Noise. This time around, the quartet from Fort Wayne, Indiana, seems to have found its niche in the instrumental world, eschewing the grand sonic explosions commonly associated with post-rock in favor of analog and electronic sounds and samples.

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DREAMFORCE (#37) Austin SXSW 2015 Unofficial House Party Announcement & Mixtape

REDEFINE magazine and Holocene present their fifth annual SXSW 2015 Unofficial House Party at House of Commons, on Friday, March 20th, 2015, featuring Rome Fortune, Beacon, Yumi Zouma, Ellie Herring, Young Ejecta, Lydia Ainsworth, J Fernandez, Doomsquad, Phedre, Grandparents, and Golden Spun. Audio-visual delights from Vision System and vVv Stardust.

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GRAMMIES – GREAT SOUNDING Album Review (Self-Released)

Everything you need to know about GRAMMIES’ new record GREAT SOUNDING can be found in its gloriously stupid title. The album constantly inverts itself, offering up increasingly next level instrumentation, song craft and emotional depth to an altar of self-sacrifice, producing a rare jazz gem that excels through humility rather than bombast. It’s an unconventional combination of far out mid-70s avant jazz, one piece jumpsuit boogie grooves and budget bin New Age cassette tape ambiance that conjures magic from the hilarious excess of early ’80s Adult Contemporary without stepping into joke band territory or leaning too much on whimsical nostalgia and irony.

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Kissinger – Childhood’s End Album Review (Crimes of the Future)

Childhood’s End, by the Croydon, UK producer Kissinger, is the first of a two-part space opera, soundtracking the loss of innocence for a planet, a society, and an individual. It shares its title with a famous sci-fi novel by Arthur C. Clarke, where humanity meets its doom at the hands of an extraterrestrial race that look like the Biblical devil. Kissinger’s record, however, isn’t as bleak or as dystopian as Clarke’s novel, reminding us that growing up needn’t be all bad.

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Sankt Otten – Engtanz Depression Album Review (Denovali Records)

The genre formerly known as post-rock has had a long, convoluted, and troubled history. It was originally used in print by the rock critic Simon Reynolds to describe bands like Talk Talk and Bark Psychosis, who were bringing in elements of less whitebread music – disco, African rhythms, jazz, krautrock, and Jamaican dub — and extending their structures to more widescreen classical formats, and blending them with the primal fury of rock ‘n roll. Post-rock may have also been the last and greatest victim of co-option and conformity (or can at least share that honor with dubstep), before finally succumbing to postmodern dissolution for good. What became of post-rock? Oh-so-serious dudes in black clothes with long band names, mindlessly aping

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Anthony Naples – Body Pill Album Review (Text Records)

A lot has been made of the importance of narrative to any kind of instrumental, or wordless, music. This may hold doubly true for electronic music, which speaks in its own vocabulary and operates in its own paradigm, with its own taboos every full electronic album needs to be some grand, convoluted concept album, like a journey through a body or a soundtrack for a race of amphibious extraterrestrials. Though fascinating, one might argue that this overlooks a producer’s personal journey, as a compelling narrative.  

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