Tag Archives: dante alighieri

Durante degli Alighieri (1265–1321), mononymously referred to as Dante, was an Italian poet, prose writer, literary theorist, moral philosopher, and political thinker. He is best known for the monumental epic poem La commedia, later named La divina commedia (The Divine Comedy). It is considered the greatest literary work composed in the Italian language and a masterpiece of world literature.

The Divine Comedy describes Dante’s journey through Hell (Inferno), Purgatory (Purgatorio), and Paradise (Paradiso), guided first by the Roman poet Virgil and then by Beatrice, the subject of his love and of another of his works, La Vita Nuova. While the vision of Inferno, is vivid for modern readers, the theological niceties presented in the other books require a certain amount of patience and knowledge to appreciate. Purgatorio, the most lyrical and human of the three, also has the most poets in it; Paradiso, the most heavily theological, has the most beautiful and ecstatic mystic passages in which Dante tries to describe what he confesses he is unable to convey (e.g., when Dante looks into the face of God: “all’alta fantasia qui mancò possa”—”at this high moment, ability failed my capacity to describe,” Paradiso, XXXIII, 142).

Readers often cannot understand how such a serious work may be called a “comedy”. In Dante’s time, all serious scholarly works were written in Latin (a tradition that would persist for several hundred years more, until the waning years of the Enlightenment) and works written in any other language were assumed to be more trivial in nature. Furthermore, the word “comedy”, in the classical sense, refers to works which reflect belief in an ordered universe, in which events not only tended towards a happy or “amusing” ending, but an ending influenced by a Providential will that orders all things to an ultimate good. By this meaning of the word, as Dante himself wrote in a letter to Cangrande I della Scala, the progression of the pilgrimage from Hell to Paradise is the paradigmatic expression of comedy, since the work begins with the pilgrim’s moral confusion and ends with the vision of God.

In Italy he is known as il Sommo Poeta (“the Supreme Poet”) or just il Poeta. Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio are also known as “the three fountains” or “the three crowns”. Dante is also called the “Father of the Italian language.” (WIKIPEDIA)

“I saw within Its depth how It conceives all things in a single volume bound by Love, of which the universe is the scattered leaves.” — Dante, Paradiso, Canto XXXIII

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San Francisco International Film Festival 2011 : 04/28 – 04/30 Round-Up

If you are looking for films from today, Wednesday, the 27th, you can see them here. Below are choice picks for the remainder of this week! Full festival details and movie listings here. — Asleep In The Sun This Argentine film evokes the tag words: “metaphysical mystery,” “canine-crazed,” “soul-deep,” “Kafkaesque world,” “psuedo scientists,” “self-possessed,” and...Read...
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Gnarled, Hellish Forms, From Katie Brookes

Herein lies the works of London-based artist Katie Brookes, who creates gently-crafted works of intense subject matter! First and foremost, a fair warning: the thin lines of her imagery seem better-suited for an etching on a copper plate, to be studied in real life, than it does for viewing on a digital medium, at low...Read...
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