Tag Archives: ernest hemingway

Ernest Miller Hemingway (21 July 1899 – 2 July 1961) was an American author and journalist. His economical and understated style had a strong influence on 20th-century fiction, while his life of adventure and his public image influenced later generations. Hemingway produced most of his work between the mid-1920s and the mid-1950s, and won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954. He published seven novels, including six short story collections and two non-fiction works. Three novels, four collections of short stories and three non-fiction works were published posthumously. Many of these are considered classics of American literature. Amongst his most famous novels are For Whom The Bell Tolls, written after a journalist stint during the Spanish Civil War, and The Old Man and the Sea.

Themes of nature, women, death, emasculation, sport, and therapy are prevalent in Hemingway’s work, and his writing style is embedded in a deep sense of realism. Henry Louis Gates believes Hemingway’s style was fundamentally shaped “in reaction to [his] experience of world war”. After World War I, he and other modernists “lost faith in the central institutions of Western civilization,” by reacting against the elaborate style of 19th century writers and by creating a style “in which meaning is established through dialogue, through action, and silences—a fiction in which nothing crucial—or at least very little—is stated explicitly.”

“The individual, the great artist when he comes, uses everything that has been discovered or known about his art up to that point, being able to accept or reject in a time so short it seems that the knowledge was born with him, rather than that he takes instantly what it takes the ordinary man a lifetime to know, and then the great artist goes beyond what has been done or known and makes something of his own.” — Ernest Hemingway, Death In The Afternoon