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Tag Archives: jazz

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Forgotten Gems & Dusty Classics: Vashti Bunyan, Bob Wills, Bud Freeman, Big Mama Thornton, Robert Pete Williams

Amassing rare and forgotten music is a peculiar sort of hobby — one that slowly transforms into an addiction. It’s not that I don’t love mainstream music. It’s just that the thrill of listening to some forgotten gem that everybody else has overlooked is powerful. It also feeds into the collector’s impulse I have to...Read...
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GRAMMIES – GREAT SOUNDING Album Review (Self-Released)

Everything you need to know about GRAMMIES’ new record GREAT SOUNDING can be found in its gloriously stupid title. The album constantly inverts itself, offering up increasingly next level instrumentation, song craft and emotional depth to an altar of self-sacrifice, producing a rare jazz gem that excels through humility rather than bombast. It’s an unconventional...
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Forgotten Gems & Dusty Classics: The Nickname Edition – Lead Belly, Bukka White, Doc Watson, Jelly Roll Morton, Hot Lips Page

Musicians tend to attract quirky nicknames, and more than a few of them stick for life. Louis Armstrong was Satchmo, Coleman Hawkins was Bean, Charlie Parker was Bird, and Lester Young was known as Prez or Tickle Toe. Sometimes they take over an artist’s identity. When Furry Lewis was asked in the 1970s how he...Read...
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Blues Music: Marketing Nostalgia Using “Race Records” in the 1920s & 1930s

Folklorists like to romanticize blues music as being a pure expression of culture, but recorded blues music was carefully marketed to its intended audience from its very beginning. As early as the 1920s, music aimed at African-Americans was labeled as "race music", and the best way to advertise it was in the pages of African-American...
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